Sunday, March 28, 2010

Top 10 Links of the Week: 3/19/10 – 3/25/10

Sweet readers! It’s the links! Better late than never, I guess.

1) The Story of Stuff: The Story of Bottled Water
Enthralling, informative, mostly-animated video on the evolution of and waste created by the bottled water boom. You could apply this to almost every processed food, but it’s particularly fascinating in H2O’s case. Ignoring advertising is half the bottle battle. (Thanks to BoingBoing for the link.)

2) Zen Habits: How to Master the Art of Mindful Eating
Guest post from stonesoup’s Jules on thinking about what you eat, a key strategy in keeping yourself satisfied. If you’ve ever plowed through a whole carton of sesame noodles without taking a breath (*cough* me *cough*), you know it’s tougher than it sounds.

3) Slashfood: The Cost of Sharing Entrees
Splitting a plate: chintzy cost-cutting measure or justifiably frugal dining move? You can probably guess which way servers lean. 106 comments and counting.

4) Wise Bread: 7 Ways to Make Use of Sub-Par Produce
Ooo! Love this compilation of ideas for about-to-go-bad fruits and veggies. Raid your past-due bin and get cooking.

5) Jezebel: Latest in Unrealistic Exercise Recommendations – A Full Hour Every Day
We don’t do too many fitness links here because I am a walking marshmallow with the endurance of a three-toed sloth. Still, moderate-to-intense exercise 60 minutes daily does seem a bit extreme, no? When do we watch 30 Rock?

6) The Kitchn: Scientists Finally Prove High Fructose Corn Syrup Risks
Princeton scientists fed a bunch of rats HFCS in two separate studies, and found they gained much more weight than rodents eating sugar. While this seems like pretty damning evidence, Marion Nestle says, “Not so fast, research dudes.” There’s a Secret of Nimh joke in here somewhere.

7) Bitch Ph.D.: If Only the Poor Were More Like Me
Excellent reminder that one person’s experience doesn’t apply to everyone.

8) Eating Well: Fast Food – The Real Cost of a Hamburger
Raj Patel, author of The Value of Nothing, argues that a $3.50 Big Mac is actually way costlier than it appears, since we pay for it dearly in other ways (environmentally, socially, etc.). Read on for deep thoughts and convincing arguments.

9) Slashfood: Is Anyone Watching Over Organics?
Another day, another gobsmacking USDA oversight. It seems no one’s testing organic foods for pesticide residue, among other things, which kind of defeats the purpose.

10) Wise Bread: Buy Your Groceries European-style
Philip buys food almost daily, based on what’s on sale and what looks good. It works for him and his family, and it’s an interesting alternative to the read-a-circular/make-a-list/don’t-deviate style most of us are taught.

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Board Game Geek: Settlers of Catan, Pizza Edition
Nerds, behold! It’s real, and it’s spectacular.

Chow: The Basics – How to Make Seared Chicken Breast
Nice graphic tutorial on the best way to prep poultry, fast.

The Kitchn: This Food Will Kill You - Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution
Lots of reviews of the Naked Chef’s new show have been floating around lately, but few have such an extensive comment thread. A good companion piece to the Bitch PhD post.

New York Times: Calorie Data to Be Posted at Most Chains
Side effect of the health care bill: restaurant chains and fast food joints have to include calorie counts in their menus. This could mean bad things for Cheesecake Factory, folks.

AND ALSO

Kotex: Reality Check Ad
This one’s for all the ladies in the place.



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2 comments:

tigerbeat said...

Love these.

wosnes said...

Thought provoking articles.

I liked the Bitch, Ph.D piece until the last two paragraphs. Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution isn't about him going to an area where they can't afford food and telling them to eat better. That's a different problem that certainly needs to be addressed. It's about people who have the resources to cook and don't; it's about people whose food choices that are making them obese and affecting their health. It's about making how we feed ourselves a priority. We've put convenience ahead of just about everything else when it comes to feeding ourselves and we're paying the price.

Where we spend our time and money is an indication of our priorities. Feeding ourselves well hasn't been a priority for quite some time. But it needs to be. It is a matter of life and death.

I've long thought that TV is the best way to get the message about eating well to the most people. Hopefully it will get more people thinking about what they eat. I think it will take more than one six-week program to do it, though.