Friday, May 6, 2011

Top Ten Links of the Week: 4/29/11 - 5/4/11

This week, it's a little bit of childhood obesity burnout, a very good Mother's Day question, and a video you will love to pieces.

1) Chow: But Mom...
I would argue that Mother’s Day might not be the time to expand your mom’s palate, but this is still a fabulous question: How do you pry your parents away from the same ol’ restaurants?

2) Culinate: Culling in the Kitchen - Does He Really Need Six Loaf Pans?
In which an ardent cook resolves to chuck the extras in his kitchen, and finds them somewhat intimidating. Hey, we’ve all bin there. Except me, I mean. (*Runs to conceal all seven of her French White Corningware casserole dishes*)

3) The Kitchn: Best Recipes for a Healthy Potluck
Potlucks and healthy recipes. This is my kind of comment thread.

4) Washington Post: Why Being a Foodie Isn't Elitist
Fast Food Nation author Eric Schlosser pens a longish essay on why giving a flying you-know-what about food shouldn't be looked upon as fascist. (Yes, fascist. The guy's been called a fascist for daring to suggest that our meat supply may not be the safest.) Caring is a good thing.

5) Food Politics: Food Stamps and Sodas
Should folks on SNAP be able to buy Pepsi with their food stamps? Some argue that not “allowing” them would be “insensitive and condescending,” but after careful consideration, Marion Nestle is for it. I don't know that I agree, but her arguments are worth reading. (Also: I know we link to Nestle every week, but no one is more thoughtful or informative when it comes to American food and eating.)

6) Wall Street Journal: Why Wood Pulp Makes Ice Cream Creamier
You know cellulose, that powdery stuff that coats grated cheese and can be found in Coffeemate (not to mention several bajillion other food products)? It’s apparently made of wood. Harmless wood, but … wood. You know how, sometimes when you’ve eaten a food for a really long time, and after years and years you find out that food is actually made of bark and roots? That is what is happening to all of us right now.

7) Time: The Sad State of American Kids' Food Environments
Lots of stats. They’re bad. (Ack. All this awareness of childhood obesity is wonderful, but to be honest, I'm kinda reaching overload.)

8) US News: Family Meals Keep Kids Slimmer, Healthier, Study Finds
No surprise. If you haven't checked out Laurie David's The Family Dinner: Great Ways to Connect with Your Kids, One Meal at a Time,which makes for excellent reading material as well as a neato cookbook, do so. It's all about this kind of stuff.

9) The Kitchn: Desserts with Three Ingredients or Less
10 ingredients, 11 totally different desserts. Neat little rundown.

9) Money Saving Mom: 3 Ways to Cut the Meat Without Decreasing Nutrition
Quick, useful, and in two cases, heretofore unknown by me, tips for reducing your meat intake.


Reuters: Do Video Games Make Kids Eat More?
With apologies to Portal 2, I will give you ten dollars if you answer correctly. (Note: I will not actually give you ten dollars.)

USA Today: Shifting Focus a Lot at Work Could Wreck Your Diet
Um … what if your job IS shifting your focus? Yuh-oh.


Story Corps: No More Questions
Story Corps' mission "is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share, and preserve the stories of our lives." Those stories are occasionally animated, like that of Kay Wang, an 87-year-old grandma who passed away just a few weeks after telling her tale. It's ... awesome. Happy Mom's Day, everybody.

No More Questions! from StoryCorps on Vimeo.

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1 comment:

Kristine said...

SNAP shouldn't pay for sodas. I see it this way: it costs the government more money, as well as helps to perpetuate their addiction. Why does it cost more? I believe that soda drinking is a major contributor to obesity. Many of the people receiving money for food are also receiving government health care - especially the children. I cannot pretend to know what the true impact would be, but if it reduces soda consumption, I am all for it.